'Traditional customer satisfaction surveys are now obsolete' - Jeremy Evans, Marketing Delivery

14 March 2016

Delivering exceptional customer service is now more challenging – and survey results are not a good enough indicator of how well you are doing.

Jeremy Evans (pictured), managing director of Marketing Delivery will tell delegates this at AM’s Customer Service Summit.

The summit, a first for AM, takes place on April 14 at Whittlebury Hall, near Silverstone, Northamptonshire, and explores the complexities of meeting the expectations of the modern consumer.

Evans said: “Understanding your customer satisfaction levels is not simply a case of sending out a survey anymore.

“Customer behaviour is changing and survey results are not a good enough indicator of their view of your business. Customers who are dissatisfied in any way will soon take to social media to vent their frustration and the effects can be far reaching.”

Evans’ session will look at how to understand the level of customer service delivered through the eyes of the consumer.

As well as social media, Evans will look at the role played by independent customer review sites.

Evans said: “A customer is a mass marketing machine in their own individual right so dealers cannot afford to ignore comments, they must respond quickly and genuinely. They then need to act if something needs to be put right.

“The traditional customer satisfaction surveys are now obsolete. Dealers who really want to understand how their customer service is perceived must be far more effective in identifying any weaknesses as well as good practice.

“In order to boost retention, dealers must have a handle on what their customers really think and address any issues promptly and effectively.”

The masterclass will highlight the ‘listening’ tools available such as Hootsuite which enables dealers to monitor comments on social media about their business.

Evans will also tackle the growing issue of malicious comments made on review sites or social media which can be from disgruntled former employees or even competitors.

“This is a growing part of the landscape,” he said.

“It’s an area which is increasing in activity and is a by-product of operating an open door policy where comments are invited and made available for everyone to see online.

“Our advice is to follow up any of those types of comments and ask them to remove it before taking further action.”

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